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Salivary Gland Disorders
Salivary gland disorders include inflammatory, bacterial, viral and neoplastic causes.

The presentation can be acute, recurrent, or chronic.

Acute suppurative sialadenitis presents as rapid-onset pain and swelling and is treated with antibiotics, salivary massage,
hydration and
sialagogues (agents that increase the secretion of saliva) such as lemon drops or vitamin C lozenges.

Viral causes include mumps and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and treatment is directed at the underlying disease.

Recurrent or chronic
sialadenitis is more likely to be inflammatory than infectious; examples include recurrent parotitis of
childhood and
sialolithiasis (salivary stones).

Inflammation is commonly caused by an obstruction such as a stone or duct stricture.  Management is directed at relieving
the obstruction.

Benign and malignant tumours can occur in the salivary glands and usually present as a painless solitary neck mass.  
Diagnosis is made by imaging (e.g., ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and biopsy
(initially with fine-needle aspiration).  Overall, most salivary gland tumors are benign and can be treated with surgical excision.
Last Updated 2nd January 2020
Diagram showing the major salivary glands (parotid, sub-mandibular & sub-lingual glands)
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Useful Articles:

Dental Update 1999.  Oro-Facial Disease. Update for the Dental Clinical Team. 8. Salivary Complaints

The Laryngoscope 2000.  Long-Term Experience with Endoscopic Diagnosis & Treatment of Salivary Gland Inflammatory
Disease

Oral Diseases 2002.  Diagnosing, Managing & Preventing Salivary Gland Disorders

Oral Diseases 2002.  Saliva - The Defender of the Oral Cavity

Oral Diseases 2002.  Saliva as a Diagnostic Fluid

Oral Diseases 2002.  Salivary Gland Tumours

Oral Diseases 2010.  Salivary Glands – ‘An Unisex Organ’?

BMJ 2012.  Clinical Review.  Salivary Gland Swellings

Dental Update 2012.  Oral Medicine 4. Dry Mouth & Disorders of Salivation

Dent Update 2013. Oral Medicine 12. Lumps & Swellings - Salivary